Determining If Your Market Supports A Big Business

In this video, Jonathan will simplify determining if your market supports your big business goals.

Hey! In this video I’m going to describe exactly how to determine if your market is big enough to support your business to the size that you want to build it. As an example, you might look at the business I have or the market I serve, which is the DFW Metroplex, the Dallas–Fort Worth area, and say, “Man, that’s a giant market, that’s why he’s able to build a bigger business,” and there would be some truth to that. But, at the same time, we only serve a little bitty piece of that area, and we don’t go outside of our service market.

Just because I’m in a big market doesn’t mean that equals a big business. I could be in a big market and have a really tiny business, which most do. Or, I could be in a smaller market and have a giant business that’s way bigger than everybody else. A few companies accomplish that. It’s not totally about the market. However, it is about the market to some degree.

I’m going to be a little longer with this video because I’m going to give you detailed instructions on how to figure out, or at least point you in the right direction, to figure out if your market can get you where you want to go. Then I’m going to tell you what to do if your market is not big enough. There are three things that you can do to help solve that problem.

The number one thing that you need to do is you need to start by figuring out how big your market is. I’m just going to use a residential example for this video, and if it doesn’t completely apply to you, you can use the framework that I’m describing to solve the problem for yourself. At least this video will give you some ideas.

First, you need to figure out how big your market is. As an example, and I’ll tell you in a minute how to do that, but as an example, let’s say your market is 100,000 homes. That’s not really your market, and when I say your market, I’m going to go with your service area. You might have a bigger market, but for whatever reason, there’s no scenario where you would ever serve that entire market, you’re just serving a service area within it. That is your market, as you’ve defined it at this moment in time.

You need to figure out how big that is, so you could look and find out that that’s 100,000 homes. The reality is that even the 100,000 homes within your service market is not your real market. There’s a sub market inside that market that is really your ideal market. First, you have to figure that out.

Here’s how I believe you do it. If you have clients now, you start to get a feel for what the value of the home is that your better clients live in. For example, maybe in your market there are homes that range in value anywhere from $50,000 to $1,000,000. Within that market, you’re going to have served all different types of clients, and you will have come to some conclusion that my best clients live in these areas, these neighborhoods. If you look, you can do some searching to find out property values, and if you look at the value of those homes, you will eventually arrive at a conclusion such as, the better clients, the clients that I want to build my business around, live in homes of $200,000 to $700,000.

There’s some number, because on the low end the client doesn’t hire services like you, or one out of every 40 on a street hires a service like you. Then on the high end, that client is way more demanding and picky and they may just not be the client you want for a variety of reasons, or you might want to build your entire business around that client. Again, another example would be, you look at your market, and the home values range from 50,000 to 1,000,000, and your business is best suited to serve clients that have home values over and above 700,000. There are different business models.

Given your business model, given the kind of client that resonates with you, what is the typical value of the home that they live in?

Back to my example, there’s 100,000 homes in your area. You conclude your ideal clients live in homes of $250,000 to $700,000. Through some searching and research you conclude that that means there’s about 30,000 homes that could be your ideal client. That’s your market.

Even though you might drive past some other homes, they may not be your market, because you don’t necessarily advertise to those areas. Or, if you ultimately win business in those neighborhoods, you don’t stay in those neighborhoods because you can’t build any density because you never get more than one or two accounts in those neighborhoods.

Step one is to figure out the value, and there’s different ways to go about this. I’m just giving you one scenario. Step one is two figure out the average value of a home that is owned by an ideal client. Then you do some googling. You can look at census data. For example, you can determine, within your county or within your city, how many homes reside within that area.

As you break the data down even further, such as how many homes of this value reside within a certain service area, that data is going to be a bit more difficult to find on Google. It might be out there, every area of the country is different. You may have to go spend a little bit of money with a company, like an InfoUSA, or a brokerage house of some kind, to do some of that data research for you.

However, one thing you’ll find is that some of the mailing lists where you can buy data, you can go do Google searches, and you can put in, “I want to buy a list of data for homes that are between this range,” and the result will come back and say, “There are 22,000 homes on this list. Would you like to buy all 22,000?” Where I’m going with this is there are some tools online where you can buy mailing lists, and the tool itself will let you put in a filter to describe the data you want to buy, and it will come back and say, “Here’s what the count is, would you like to buy it? Or would you like to segment that list even further?” My point is, using the tool to buy the list, you could go as far as researching, getting your answer, and not even buy the data. There are some creative ways you can go about figuring out how many homes are of that value inside your market.

That’s step one. You figure out your ideal client, the value of the home.

Step two, you do some googling and you look at the census data, figure out how many homes are in the area.

Step three is you try some more googling to figure out if you can find a listing of how many homes are in that neighborhood based on that valuation. If not, then you can go to brokers to buy a list, you can go to marketing firms that, again, want to sell you a list or do direct mail for you. You’ll find that, in your market, if you do a little digging, there are people that know that data because they’re in the business of doing marketing and they have to know that data, and they’re selling their services to you. That data, if you can’t find it on Google, can be found in your marketplace. You might have to spend a little bit of money, but it won’t be a lot.

Now you have a real picture of how many homes are in your market. Let’s say it’s 50,000. Now you have to make a guess, can you sell 1% of the market? 4% of the market? 10% of the market? If you could sell 10% of the market and you have 40,000 homes in your market, then your top end opportunity is you could have 4,000 clients at any one time.

There’s so many different directions I could go with this, I’m just going to keep it simple. Your mind might be running about, “Well, what if I lose clients and what if once I lose them, do they count against the 10%?” I don’t know where your mind might be going with this, but just keep it simple and stick with me to understand this concept, and that is if you think the 10,000 is the top end, then your … Excuse me, 10% is the top end, therefore 4,000 clients is your top end. If you think it’s 1%, the best you can achieve is 1% of the market, then that means your best case with my 40,000 home example is 400 homes. At least you start to get a feel.

In my opinion, with really high quality, really high customer service, you’re going to be … you can absolutely penetrate, without question, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5% of the market over the years. For sure. I believe that without question. But, you’re going to need to be unique. You’re going to need really good service. You’re going to need really good quality, and you can’t be the most expensive, but you can be towards the top of the market in pricing. You might be the most expensive on certain services, but you can’t be dramatically more expensive than everybody else in your marketplace and deeply penetrate into the market, meaning that you own a very significant portion of the market.

We’re just going to assume that you could definitely capture 2-5% of the market relatively easily by just being really good, and of course learning how to do marketing. Now, you might be able to try and penetrate 10+% of the market. That’s going to be a little more difficult. One, if you’re in a big market, you just have to build a really big company. The more you want to penetrate deeper into the market, the more money you have to spend. I’m going to come back to that in a moment, but the more you have to spend.

For example, what you might find is that over the first number of years of doing a lot of marketing, whether it be web marketing, print marketing, that your average sale is $100, $150 per sale. Maybe that’s what you’ve figured out that it costs, on average, through marketing, to bring in a new client. That allowed you to penetrate to some percentage. Every market’s different, but let’s say that gets you to a 3% penetration inside your market. It’s impossible for me to say, “You could do 5% no problem, or 3%, or 10%.” Every market’s a little different. There’s a little bit of  guessing here, and you’ll figure it out over the years and refine it.

Let’s say that you could penetrate 3% of your market and you could do that at about $150 cost per sale. Now, what you might find is to go deeper inside the market, to bring in more clients, to own more of the market, however you want to say that, it’s going to become more expensive, because the majority of the market has already heard your message. If you want to attract the portion of the market that has not paid attention and not bought, based on all the marketing you’ve already done to them, you’ve got to continue to step up your marketing game. Maybe your incentives need to become greater. Maybe you need to give them more. Maybe they need to get more touches, meaning you need to market to them more and more, and they need to see you more frequently; you need to show up more often. That’s going to increase your conversion cost.

Now, maybe, to get the next percentage of gain in the marketplace, you’re going to need to have a cost per sale of $300 a client. Again, numbers are not accurate, they’re examples, but you can see how this would work. There’s going to be a cost per sale in the beginning, and then to get to that next layer, your cost per sale is going to go up. And then, to get deeper in the market your cost per sale is going to go up again.

There will come a point to go really deep in the market where you have to say, “Okay, is it worth spending more money to go deeper in this market to get more market share, or am I better off taking my pile of cash and expanding my service market or opening up a branch office in another service market, and skimming the easy sales off that market?” These are considerations, and all of these considerations are … Well, you think about them in terms that determine, “Okay, what’s my potential? How big could my company get, given my market size?”

Now, let’s say that in your market your determine that you only have 10,000 homes. That’s your best case. You have 10,000 potential buyers. Even within the 10,000 homes, something I didn’t say, let’s go back to my example. You have concluded who the 10,000 ideal homes are, telling you how big your market is based on home value. Well, then there’s another number within that number, and that number is the percentage of buyers at that home value.

Let me explain that slightly better. Just because you’ve determined that somebody that lives in a $250,000 to $750,000 house is potentially a good client. That doesn’t mean that 100% of that market buys lawn care, or pest control, or fertilization and weed control. No, within that market, there might be 40% of that market being actual buyers, meaning 60% does it themselves. That’s another number to consider. You can’t necessarily know that in the beginning, but that’s true in every market.

Back to my example, there’s 10,000 homes, and that’s one of the reasons why when I say your market penetration or your percentage of market share, that’s probably a better way to say it, market share is going to be 1, 2, 3, 5, 10%. That’s why it’s not going to be 60%, because there’s a very significant portion of that market that isn’t, even though they’re in an ideal sized home, ideal dollar value home, they are not an ideal client in that they are not a buyer of what you have to sell.

Let’s rewind and let’s just go back to the 10,000 to keep this simple. I was illustrating that … The reason I said the 5,000 was just to give an example of, even if your universe is 10,000, your potential is 10,000, you’ll never capture all of that. It’s impossible because within that group there’s a percentage that are not even buyers. Going back to the 10,000. If you were to gain 3% market share, your theory is that’s what you can get or earn, then you’re looking at 300 clients as your top end of your market.

3%, I think, generally, sounds a little low to me. You can do better. But let’s say it’s 3%, that’s only 300 clients. Now, you’ve determined that my best case is only 300 clients in my market, so what do you do? Well, there’s three things you can do. One is, you can expand your market. It might be that you arbitrarily shrunk your market to create route density inside your business. You could first focus on owning as much of the confined market as you can, and once you’ve saturated that market, you then expand, but you wait to expand until you’ve saturated it.

The way you know that you’ve started to saturate the market is because you’re actually spending marketing dollars and your cost per conversion is increasing. It used to $100 per sale, now it’s up to $175. In other words, what worked easily in the past isn’t working so well. You’re starting to achieve a level of saturation where you could keep going, without question, but it’s getting more expensive. That is a time when it might make sense to expand the market a little bit bigger.

That’s one, you expand the market. That broadens the size of the market, obviously, which means you could sell more clients back into that market. You have a bigger potential market share, to grow your business. Maybe you go from a market universe or market opportunity of 300 clients to now 600.

Another option, number two, would be that you, instead of expanding client count, you expand revenue per client. Let’s say your market possibilities are 300 clients, an average client spends 3,000 a year with you, you can do the math to figure out, I think that’s about a $900,000 a year business. You want to get to $2,000,000, that means you need to turn that $3,000 a year client into a $6,000 a year client, on average.

How do you achieve that? This is an alternative to expanding the market. You expand your service offering. In the past, you were mowing, fertilization, weed control, services of that sort. Now you get into pest control and other service types. That broadens your service offering, which allows you to sell more back into the clients to grow the client value, which, at the end of the day, allows you to achieve the bigger revenue company that you want.

That’s number two. Number three is you look at your little market of 300, and you’re early in your business, and you say, “You know what, this just isn’t good enough for me.” You literally pack up the business and you move elsewhere. That’s not the answer anybody wants to here, but that is the reality for some individuals in certain markets. I do a lot of traveling, and on vacations we’ll travel to places that are not necessarily heavily populated. In the mountains, or maybe we go to Arkansas to hike and do things like that.

You’ll end up in some of these areas, and if I happen to have been born in those areas, my universe or my potential market would have been very small. The homes are way spread out, there’s not nearly as many homes, it’s rural areas. I can’t build a great business in that market. There is no magic, you can’t just magically build it. If you’re a savvy business person, you look at that and you say, “I want to build a big business, this market cannot support it, and I am going to relocate my business to an area that could.”

If I was in some rural area of Arkansas, I’d relocate to Little Rock, or something of the sort. If I’m in a rural area of wherever, California, I’m going to locate to a bigger city. You get the idea. Moving is your third option, and if your business just won’t support it … Maybe even your area has lots of homes, but it’s a low income area, and 5% of people, 10% of people in that market buy the services you have to sell. That’s not a great market. You’re going to have to market to a whole lot of homes to find the 10 that are buyers.

It’s better to be in a market that you’re marketing to a group where 50% or 60% of the market is a buyer, because you have to market to far fewer homes to find those buyers inside the market. These are the things you want to consider, to figure out if your market will support you, and then those are the three things you do to position yourself so that there’s a big enough market that you can get enough market share to build the business of your dreams. The business that will give you and your family what you want. It’s really as simple as that. Takes a little bit of thinking, but it’s not that difficult.

Facebook Marketing Tips For Lawn Care Businesses

In this interview, Martha shares some key Facebook marketing tips that have contributed to her success.

Jonathan: I’d like to share an interview with you. It’s with Martha. She’s a friend of mine, and she owns a company by the name of Quality Driven. We did a series of 5 interviews. I’m gonna be releasing those over the next 2 weeks, and in this first one we’re talking about Facebook. Now her business is not quite like ours. She’s in the residential cleaning business. Imagine how difficult that would be to send your teams into your clients’ homes every day. Her typical client, her buyer is a woman. Much like our business, but she deals a lot with the woman of the household. She has found a way to make Facebook really successful. They utilize Facebook at a very high level inside their company, not just from a marketing standpoint but also from the communication standpoint and from an internal communication standpoint with the team. She has a number of tips for you, a number of great ideas. She’s absolutely worth listening to because she knows how to use Facebook. Enjoy the interview.

Hey Martha, how are you doing?

Martha: I’m good. How are you?

Jonathan: I’m doing great, thanks for doing this. I wanted to ask you a number of questions, and one of those questions has to do with Facebook. I’ve noticed that you and your team do a pretty good job with Facebook, I think both publicly, and then I’ve got to guess that behind the scenes communicating with your clients you probably do a pretty good job. I’m not so great at Facebook. Do you have any best practices or tips you’ve learned over the years?

Martha: Well, unfortunately I spend way too much time on Facebook but I do use it for business a lot. I do that to the customers that we serve, and prospective customers of course, but then also internally we actually use Facebook for … I have an office Facebook group, I have a staff Dusting Divas Facebook group, and it’s just an easy way to communicate, “Hey, we’re closing today because of the weather.” I mean we do a lot of just internal marketing to our staff in that group. I have mainly women so we share recipes, they share things about their family in there, and I’ve purposely made it that way so we get staff engagement and as I’m sure you know from gallop polls, one of the most important reasons people stay is because they have friends at work. I think that’s probably more true for females than males but we have men too, and they engage as well, so we use it for that.

It’s quick, easy communication for office staff because I work from home a lot and then we have 2 branches, so it’s easy for me to communicate there, and then our official Dusting Divas page, I guess we have about almost 5,000 followers, and you know what I’ve done is just figure out who’s our market, who seeks out our service, and then we post things that are of value to them. Because we are appealing mainly to women between the ages, our target market is 28-55, we do a lot of Pinterest type posts where, I don’t even know if you know Pinterest.

Jonathan: Yeah, oh yeah.

Martha: Okay.

Jonathan: I don’t do it, but I know of it.

Martha: Okay, and I don’t actually do a whole lot of it, but I have actually outsourced that because I just couldn’t keep up. You need to do at least 3-4 posts a day, and it’s just very time consuming. We have a person in the MyService world who actually does the posts for about 20 of us, all in different locations. It’s awesome because she makes money posting on Facebook, and we all get our needs served for a very reasonable price. If the lawn care world could work together and come up with something like that, that would be awesome. In addition to, I’ll go on and post and I certainly use our page for posting specials that we might be running. I will post opt-ins so that they opt in our newsletter for newsletter-only specials. We may have contests around the holidays like for Mother’s Day or something and do a give-away and do a lead capture. We’ll definitely run ads for employees on our Facebook page. What I do is if something’s popular that was posted I’ll boost it, and then I may run ads on something in particular I want to promote.

Jonathan: Do you feel like Facebook brings in business? Can you with certainty measure or determine that you’ve brought in some new clients or that you’ve sold additional clients more business because of using Facebook?

Martha: Definitely, and I wish I could quantify it better but here is what I know. We ask every lead that comes in, “How did you hear about us?” Believe it or not for us, Facebook is our second leading source, right behind Google online search.

Jonathan: Wow.

Martha: Yeah, it’s huge for us.

Jonathan: Is that because of running paid ads, or is it, and I know you boost sometimes but is it because you’re running paid ads on Facebook, or is it because they’re just having to find you organically?

Martha: It’s both.

Jonathan: Okay.

Martha: Until the last year, I probably didn’t run a lot of ads. I’ve learned a lot this past year about, I spent a lot of time and money learning about Facebook marketing but even prior to this last year, Facebook I believe it was number 3 for us, so it has been big for us for a long time. We are a relationship building service. In our world, they’re letting us in their home so they want to know us, but you’re service business too, so people want to know you all too. It gives them a way to know something about your company. People comment on posts that I didn’t make, but they’ll comment on it and I make sure I get on there and engage with them. That’s really important to get on there and engage with them and talk to them just as if they were my neighbor. The girl that we hired actually does some of that for us, but like I said, I’ll get on there and when we’re having maybe a company party or we’re doing something inside the business that I want to show them the face of our company, I will post pictures, I’ll tell them about what we’re doing. I want them to feel like they know something about us to build trust. That’s really …

Jonathan: That’s a great idea. Do you post, does your team in a case like that where you have a picture, maybe your team was having a meeting or your team did an event and you took pictures, does your team then post that themselves or do you send that information over to the individual that’s doing Facebook for you and they take care of it?

Martha: Either I post it, or my office manager posts it.

Jonathan: Okay.

Martha: Yes. Anything that is specific to us, I take care of that, and I don’t expect her to take care of my specific need, and I do enjoy it. You know, I maybe go on and post something specific to the company twice a month. She does all the rest of it.

Jonathan: Okay. Did you say she’s posting 4 times a day?

Martha: She’s posting 3-4 times a day.

Jonathan: Okay. Maybe just a couple more quick things here before we wrap this up. In terms of a, have you found a best practice for dealing with a complaint? Let’s say a client goes on to Facebook and is disappointed with service that day, or just something, how do you guys deal with that?

Martha: Of course apologize.

Jonathan: Yeah.

Martha: Whether we did it or not, and then I will when I’m writing the answer, of course you’re not only writing to the person that complained but to anyone who might view it. Really all the clients and then perspective clients want to know is, are we gonna take care of it? Are we reasonable? Are we good to deal with? So I just make sure to apoligize, not make excuses, basically we’ll get it handled now. If it was a person and I had this actually happen, where she’s trashed us and we didn’t even clean her home, we refused our service because she wanted it for a certain price and it was half of the total price, and we were like thank you very much, here are some names you might try. She slammed us online, so in that case I basically said, “I’m so sorry you were disappointed, and I’m very sorry that we were not able to clean your home for the price that you were requesting, dadadada.” The public knew, listen, we did not clean your home, and we did not do these things you’re saying.

Jonathan: Makes sense. Any parting last best practices?

Martha: You know, I guess all I would say is, you have to go all in, you cannot halfway do a Facebook page effectively. Many people don’t have luck with their Facebook page because it does take a lot of time, and honestly, maybe you should come up with a service if you want to be a millionaire, a social media service, but that group sharing that we do is awesome. We don’t even post that much about house cleaning itself, but we post things that are relevant to our target market.

Jonathan: That makes perfect sense.

Martha: They follow us, and so when we go to live events, many times people will read our sign and then go, “Oh, I follow you on Facebook”, and they feel like they already know you. I think that’s the value of Facebook.

Jonathan: That’s good. Last thought on this. If someone were to just get started and look into determine that, this should get some level of priority in my overall marketing plan, marketing calendar, do you feel like there’s 6-months to build it up and start to see results or a year to build it up and start to see results? Or if you jump into it correctly and invest your time, do you see pretty quick results? Do you happen to remember based on when you got started?

Martha: Yes, I mean for sure 6 months, and to be realistic, probably a year, and I will tell you that I used to boost posts way more than I do now. I used to run a lot more content, that’s really how I built up the page, running content and doing things that would bring people in. Now, when I ran the contests, I would only market it though to our target audience, so there’s a way that you can run those contests and have those contests just show to your target demographics including income so that I didn’t get people wanting freebies that really weren’t our target market.

Jonathan: Makes perfect sense. Great. Well, thank you for the tips, they’re absolutely helpful. Thanks Martha.

Martha: Thank you.

What If My Marketing Doesn’t Work?

Do this and you won’t have to worry about “what if my marketing doesn’t work”…

This question is about the  fear of putting out door hangers or marketing pieces, blowing the money, and it not working. It is a very valid fear.

This individual says they refuse to work for anyone and they’re determined to make it on their own. I think that’s absolutely fantastic! I think you should do everything necessary and put whatever amount of time, hours, heartache, frustration, and expense you have to commit to this. You should do it to make this happen. It will set you up for a completely different life down the road.

I think you’re going down the right path.

This is a fear that everybody has. I’ve even had it. I’ve lost plenty of money making mistakes. Unfortunately, that’s how we generally learn.

I’m going to give you a piece of advice that you probably won’t like. But, if you follow it, you will be successful. The reason that your marketing won’t work, whether it’s direct mail, door hangers, or whatever the media is,  you’ve got to make sure you’re going after people that can buy your service. Make sure you are in the right market. If these people can buy from you, if they can afford you, if they have a need, for example. The best way for you to figure that out is if you already have tons of competitors in that neighborhood, or in that area. If you have tons of competition right there … and I mean tons … then there’s a need. That’s the perfect market. You don’t look for a market where there aren’t competitors. You look for the market where there’s the most competition, because that means there’s huge need.

It is the message that matters. Of course media plays a part because you want to make sure it gets read and you want to make sure it gets seen. You want to make sure it doesn’t go straight in the trash.  But, the message is the most important part.

This is where the advice comes in that may not be so exciting. How do you perfect your message? If you want to communicate and you want to make this stuff work, then you have to be saying things to your prospective client that resonates with them. What is it that you have to say to make people get off the couch and go to their computer to request an estimate? That’s really what this comes down to. If you think about it in those simple terms, you’ll be able to figure this out.

What would it take to get your prospect to take action? Be really realistic about this. What would it take? Let’s say somebody’s selling you something, not lawn care, because you know lawn care, but something else completely different. What if someone wanted to come to your home and wash your car every week? That’s a luxury that most people might not spend money on. So, what is it that I would have to say to you that would be so convincing that you would spend 35 or 40 bucks a week, or whatever that number is, for me to come to your house and wash your car every week? You’ve got to really think about it in those terms. That type of thinking is what you apply to solving the problem of insuring that your material is going to work.

The way you do this is you go knock on doors. It’s the fastest, easiest way. Just go knock on some doors. Tell yourself that this is a test. You may not sell anything, but you are going to learn an incredible amount just by knocking on doors. You’re not looking to make sales here. Sales are a bonus. What you’re hoping for is to figure out what people object to. When you ask to mow their lawn or take over their pest control, what is the objection that they say? Are they too busy, do they like their existing company, do they maintain it on their own? What are the objections? You’re listening for that.

Then you’re listening to what their frustrations are. They don’t like lawn companies, nobody remembers to close the gate, they accidentally scalped my yard or burned my lawn with chemicals. Listen to their complaints.

Next, listen to their dislikes. Are they looking for a bigger, well known company? Are they looking for a company that has uniforms and painted trucks? These are things you’re not really going to hear, but they’re examples of dislikes. What is it that they dislike about you? What is it they dislike about your competition?

With that, you’re concluding what their fears are. Their fears are that they’re going to overpay. Their fears are that you’re not going to do a good job. Their fears are that they’re going to switch lawn care companies again and you’re going to once again let them down like every other lawn care company has. Their fears are that they don’t know if your people are trustworthy and honest. Their fears are that you’re not really going to show up on the day that you promise. Their fears are on, and on, and on.

So, you’re looking for their objections. What do they dislike about me or my competitors? What are their complaints about companies like me? From that, you conclude their fears. This lets you craft the message. They have a checklist in their mind that are their buying criteria. When you, on your marketing piece, address all these things, so you preempt their objections, you position yourself to win this game.

The question isn’t really, “How do I ensure that I’m not going to make a mistake and waste my money, and my marketing’s not going to work?” The real question is, “How do I minimize it? How do I take the most risk out of this process of marketing?” The way you do that is you make sure you’re going after the right market with tons of competition. Then, you make sure you’re going after that market at the right time of year. Don’t sell me mowing in winter. Don’t sell me fertilization and weed control in winter. Don’t sell me irrigation when I don’t have an irrigation system in my lawn and you’re selling me repair work. You get the idea. Sell it at the right time of year. Sell me something that I can actually buy. Address and preempt my objections, my fears, my frustrations, and then give me a reason to do it.

I’ll add two more. Give me a reason to do it. Why in the world should I take action with you now? Why should I not just wait until next year? Why should I not just wait another month? Remember. It’s a hassle for me to drop my current company and go with you. Why should I work with you now? You’ve got to give me a compelling reason to do it. Just addressing my objections is not enough. You might have to give me something…a bonus, a gift, a freebie, something. Twenty-five dollars free to mow your lawn is not very exciting. You’ve got to get me something to make me move.

I’ll leave with this. On that marketing piece, how do you get me to look at your marketing piece over the other three that are on my door right now? How do you stand out, catch my attention, and get read. Why do I keep your piece, and throw your three competitors in the trash? How do you get me to notice you above every other piece on my door, all the other noise that’s happening in my mailbox and on my door? That’s the stuff you work on.

When you figure that out, then you’ve nailed it and you’ll minimize your risk. You’ll minimize your mistakes. Even the pros screw this up. There is no high-dollar marketing person that you can hire that will get it right all the time. There are so many variables. You will make mistakes. This is a game. You’re not just doing marketing once. You’re doing marketing over years, and years, and years. You’re going to have some screw-ups and there’s nothing you can do about it. It’s part of the game, but the wins build the business. The wins make you rich. The wins give you a great lifestyle.

You’re playing the game to minimize risk and achieve as many wins as possible. The best way to do it is just get out there and start testing in small samples. Try little things. The way you learn the fastest is to go talk to people, hear what they say, and apply that to your marketing. Then, read marketing books. On LawnCareMillionaire, you can download my free ebook. That has the 34 best, most important books that I’ve read. A bunch of those books are about marketing. Read every book on that list and do everything I just said. You will be successful and you will make a minimal number of marketing mistakes. Good luck.

My Number One Lawn Care Marketing Tip

Watch this video to learn Jonathan’s number one lawn care marketing tip.

When I’m asked to critique a door hanger, postcard, website, some type of marketing piece, the most common thing that I see is that piece is trying to do too much. It’s trying to say too much. It’s trying to be too much. When I say it’s trying to say too much, I don’t mean that it’s too wordy because I often find that a lot of copy and text works well when combined with the right imagery.

What I mean by trying to say too much is, it’s possibly trying to give so much information that it’s trying to go straight for the sell. It’s trying to give price, all the benefits, five different ways to get a hold of you, and what’s being imagined when that piece was created is how can I get them to sign up for my service?

Really, the way you want to think about it, and so this is a really important tip in whatever marketing piece you create, what is the next action that you want them to take? The final outcome, the goal is to sell. You want them to sign up but you have to move them, this prospect, forward in baby steps. You’ve got to make it effortless, so the reality is that when they receive your door hanger on their door or a postcard in their mailbox, all you really want them to do is to pick up the phone and call you, visit your website and fill out an estimate form or, send you an email. It’s probably one of those three things.

The real purpose of your marketing piece is to get them to do that. It’s not to go for the sale. That’s why it’s not always necessary to put pricing material onto your marketing piece. You don’t need them to know the pricing yet because you’re not going to make the sale yet. All I need them to do, all you need them to do is contact you. When they contact you, you can give them the next set of selling points that they need to hear. You can tell them about the benefits. You can answer their objections.

Then you can give them price because yes, they do need price eventually to make that buying decision, but they may not need it initially. That’s why in most of my marketing pieces I never run the price. It’s not necessary. The only thing I need them to do is contact me. Then the sales team will take the next step, or if they’re sending in a request for an estimate, then our sales team and our estimators or whomever will take that next step. But, all that marketing piece is supposed to do is get them to contact you.

When you think about it that way, that can allow you to mentally focus on that one task, and you can get all the unnecessary language and copy and text off of that marketing piece and focus just on that one mission. If you think about it that way, it will simplify the process that you have to go through to create a marketing piece. It’ll tell you mentally exactly what you’re trying to accomplish and how to go about that, and then you’ll find that your marketing is more successful.

How can I create immediate income in my lawn care business?

Question: “I’m just getting started. How can I create immediate income in my lawn care business?

One of the great things about the landscape industry is that you really can create immediate income.

You can go out and get work versus waiting for it to come to you.  As a result it is possible to find work quickly.

All you have to do is walk down the street, knock on doors, introduce yourself and tell the story of your company.  It takes a small bit of courage, but it works!

If you are selling commercial, you walk in the door and ask for the business.  You ask to bid the property.

If they don’t need you now (most won’t), find out when their existing agreement expires or when the contract will go out for bid.  Put that date on your calendar and follow up months in advance to ensure you have an opportunity to participate in the bidding process.

Don’t forget to ask for the name of the person who will make the decision.

These are the three fastest ways to get immediate income:

1) Knock on doors.

2) Put out door hangers. If you don’t have money, pass them out yourself.

3) Build a high quality website and run PPC ads. Google the term Adwords to learn more.

Let’s assume during the start up phase you are in the field 40% of the week. You don’t have enough work to fill up an entire week.  So, the other 60% of the week you need to spend your time prospecting for new business.

Regarding price…

I’ve heard many say when you are starting out, price low. Then, once you earn some business and your customers trust you, raise your prices.

I disagree.

Start out pricing yourself near the middle of the market or higher.

If you price too low, as you start growing, you will not have any money to hire help.  You won’t have money to buy good eqiupment.  You won’t have money to advertise your business.

You will get trapped in the field if you don’t have money.

Long term, the only way to make a lot of money is to get yourself out of the field and pay others to do all of the field work.

As you grow you will have less and less time to focus on sales and marketing.  You MUST constantly replace yourself in the field by hiring help.

Doing so frees up more of your time to seek out new business.

If you stop marketing and selling, your revenue stream will dry up.

Each time you replace yourself in the field, resume exactly what made you successful in the first place…knocking on doors, distributing door hangers, online marketing, asking for referrals, etc.

As you hire ‘guys’ to help, demand hard work and quality. Don’t accept poor or slow work. If you look at an employee and realize that you could do that job in 30% the time it takes them, you’ve hired the wrong person.

There are plenty of great guys. A lot of those guys will surprise you by out-working you.

Don’t settle for mediocre people.  It will kill your business and burn you out.

Once you hire your first foreman and have successfully replaced yourself with a self-operating crew, you have accomplished a major milestone.

Repeat this several times, price correctly, and you will find you have the money to hire an operations person to help you run the business.

Once you reach this point you are well on your way.

You will be ahead of most of your peers in the industry.

Go make your first sell.  Not next month.  Now.

 

 

Stand Out From The Competition And Have Customers Remember You

Watch this video and learn what makes customers remember you in your market.

Are you highly visible in your market? As you’re looking at your trucks today, pay attention to how they show when someone that doesn’t know you sees your trucks on the road. Or, if you have a whole bunch of white trucks, is that doing anything to constantly pound your name into your prospective client’s mind?

Just as important, when you send out marketing, or another client refers you, you want the person, the prospect, to have an association with your company. If I refer you to my friend, you want my friend to have thought, oh yeah, those are the guys I see all the time. I have see them.

That gives them confidence. That makes them feel like they’re making a safe, wise choice. So, running around in an all-white or all-black truck…well, if you’re my competitor, it’s awesome. I would prefer that you continue doing that. But, if you’re not my competitor, I’d suggest that you don’t do that.

Here’s a simple black truck and just look what the pink accents do to this truck. I guarantee if you have five of these running around, people will remember you. Your marketing will work better, referrals will work better, all kinds of things will work better.

Being remembered is important and when you’re seen, you need to be able to be easily differentiated from everyone else in your marketplace.

Lawn Care Door Hanger Critique

Listen to this lawn care door hanger critique to optimize your marketing and get more customers.

I am critiquing this door hanger, and giving feedback. Originally there was a phone number at the top left, in the center there was a logo, and at the right there was a web address. Down below it said “call today”. It had a phone number, it said “visit us” and it had a web address. I’ve removed the identifying information, and I’m critiquing this door hanger for an individual. You can listen to my feedback. This is in no specific order and I’m not going from notes. I’m just going to go down through here and give some pointers.

On this door hanger there’s no door hanger hole and I personally think that is ideal. I don’t believe you want a door hanger hole, so I think that’s good. In certain markets you may feel that you need one, but generally I don’t see most door hanger companies using the hole to hang the door hanger on the doorknob. That’s good that gives you more space. In your email you mentioned that on the other side of this door hanger you were going to use some pretty pictures and some imagery. My suggestion would be that you use some imagery on both sides, and also that both sides have some compelling information.

Whether the door hanger has a hole, or you rubber band it to the door, what you don’t know is which direction this will hang on the door or which side will face out. You can imagine that the individual grabs the mail off their door and they walk it to their trashcan in the kitchen. You don’t know which direction your door hanger will be facing as they’re holding that and walking your door hanger to the trash. For that reason I recommend that your door hanger has a headline and something compelling at the top on both sides.

My first thought on this is at the top you have a phone number, your logo, your web address, and so it could be that that’s the first thing I see. But, nothing about that communicates to me what’s in it for me. So, you have just a couple minutes to catch my attention. Your main hope with this piece is that I am in need of lawn care, and when I see this I think to myself, “Well, lawn care’s exactly what I’ve been looking for. I’ll call these guys.” You’re banking on lawn care, and the words “landscape” and “lawn care” to resonate with me because I have immediate need. But, that’s the only way you’d grab me at this moment with this piece.

My suggestion would be that at the top, you have some type of a headline that grabs my attention, and states a benefit to me. That headline could be what you’re going to do for me, what problem you’re going to solve, or some type of promotional benefit of what I’m going to get. Such as, if I sign up for lawn service, I’m going to get a free iPod shuffle or something along those lines to catch my attention. But, you’ve only got a couple seconds to do it, and it needs to be at the top. I’d recommend that same statement to be on both sides because you don’t know which side I’ll be looking at as I walk your door hanger into the house to the trashcan. That’s point number one.

You need to think about what your client’s number one, two, and three wants are, what their top one, two or three fears are, and you need to answer those in the headline. Give them some reason that they should contact you versus anyone else. If I’m your competitor and my door hanger’s on the door with yours, why is yours going to get their attention over mine? You need to have some type of headline that pulls them in, gets them to read, and continue reading this door hanger.

If for your services you have lawn maintenance, landscapes, snow removal, and then you have some additional services down here. I think that is important to call out the specific services that you offer. You don’t have a price on here, anything like that and I think that’s perfectly okay. What you’re doing here is you’re calling out the key services so that if I have a need, I see these and I think, “Oh this might be for me”, and I continue reading. Good job with that. I would continue that. You might try a slightly different design. Let me come back to that, let me mention design.

If you’re going to print ten thousand of these and you’re going to distribute them, you’re going to have some cost. I would recommend spending one or two hundred dollars, or some amount of money, and get somebody to quickly put together the design for you. I know you’re running out of time here, but it could make all the difference in your results. By spending a couple hundred dollars you could potentially double your response rate. I would absolutely have somebody help you with the design of this. The cost could be all over the board. They could lay it out in Photoshop or Illustrator or professional software and they could get it laid out in font. They could use all the same font types and they could make it look really nice for you and bring in some imagery and your logo and make it look like you’re a large operation.
This is not doing justice in appearance to your business. In terms of what you actually are as a business, this doesn’t look nearly as professional as you are or nearly as professional as your website. Your website looks really professional, but this doesn’t communicate that same message. I would recommend having a designer try to bring that same level of look and feel and professionalism to this, so that when I see this I get immediate confidence that this is a professional company. I would spend the money on that. I’ll just focus on copy from here on out.

The reason I said all that is, within that design I would probably somehow bullet point or call out the services here. It’s maybe not the first focus point. The first focus point, the biggest copy, the thing that my eye falls on, should be the headline. Then this would be another focus point, but not the primary one, somewhere on here where all the services that you offer are grouped together. That would be one thing I’d do.

The direction you’re going with an interesting fact, that’s a good one. Your thought process, in my opinion, is good. I hope you don’t take offense to anything I say here in terms of critiquing this. I would go a different direction based on what I’ve learned. I don’t know your market, so it may be different. My hunch is that you’re not trying to convince the guy that doesn’t have his lawn mowed to suddenly start hiring a company to mow his law, or provide whatever service you’re trying to sell. Rather, your buyer is most likely someone that already has lawn care company, has already decide that it’s worth spending the money, and doesn’t need to be convinced; they’re your easiest sell. I would market to them.

For example, if I was competing against you in your market and you gave me 20 home owners that don’t buy lawn care and haven’t in the last three years, or you gave me a list of 20 home owners that buy lawn care and have been buying lawn care for the last 5 years, I would only market to those people and I’d ignore the 20 that don’t buy lawn care. There are a small number of them that will convert and most that do convert may not stay with it long term. I don’t even want to focus my energy on them. You don’t know who those individuals are when you’re putting out your door hangers, so you need to at least craft your message to your most likely buyer and your most likely buyer already has a lawn service.

The direction here is good. An alternative would be to speak directly to that individual that has lawn service now. What is their concern going to be? Their concern is going to be that my gates are not being closed, that the last lawn care company that I had, the one that I’m looking to replace, doesn’t show up consistently, that the company I have now when there are weather delays or problems they don’t tell me what they’re doing or when I can expect them. They just show up, they don’t answer their phone when I call, I never get my invoicing on time, it’s always a different individual at my home and the work is never consistent. You could go down the list of the complaints you’ve heard from your potential clients about the companies they’ve been working with and that’s why they’re calling you. Answer those objections here.
What you’re doing with the interesting fact, great idea, but how could you tell me some of the benefits that I’m going to get. Bullet pointed lists work well on this stuff; it’s easy to read. It’s easier to read a bullet point list and it’s easier for the mind to quickly sort it out then it is to have to read several paragraphs. It might be that you bullet point out some differences and why we’re your best solution.

That’s another point. I would use more of “you” in this. This is about “you” as in the client. When you’re talking, make sure you’re using a lot of words like “you” instead of words like, “we”, “our”, “us”. Try to shift the writing just a little bit so you’re focused on the person that’s reading it, because it’s about them. You might make your headline something like, “You will receive this”, “you will get this”. Something, again, about them, that’ll be part of the headline. Then, make your bullet points, again, something about them. “You will experience this.” “You will get this if you use our company.” List out the ways you’re different than everyone they’ve used in the past. Tell them what the services are that you offer, and then give them a reason to take action with you.

“Spring is right around the corner. We are now booking our lawn mowing accounts for the year. So call today.” My critique here would be yes, you’re reminding them that spring is right around the corner. Again, I hope you don’t think I’m being too harsh. Where I’m going with this is I don’t know if “Spring is right around the corner” is necessary to say. They know it. The reason I say that is, one thing I’ve learned, and I don’t necessarily do a good job at this, is I’ve heard that great writing is about editing out every unnecessary word. I tend to be a wordy person and so I don’t think I’m necessarily good at that. I’m thinking that maybe this doesn’t help sell anything. I would probably edit those words out and focus on just power words and bigger things that you need to communicate because you have limited space.

Where I felt like you were going, “We are now booking our lawn mowing accounts for the year.” You could go a couple directions with this. One, maybe you are trying to say that “We serve your neighborhood and I’ve got one crew available. We can accept 14 more accounts in your market, in your area, in your zip code, in your city, and then we’re filled up for the year.” Maybe there is some angle like that where you can tell me, “You need to respond right away if you want to do business with our company.” At the top you lay out in the headline the benefits of why I should use you. In the middle, you tell me what you can do for me and why my experience with you is going to be different. Why are you better than all your competitors? Then, at the bottom give me a reason to take action immediately. One could be that it’s limited, in some way there’s a limitation. If I don’t take immediate action I’ll miss out, there’s scarcity. That could be that we only have one crew in your market and there are only this many slots left on that crew and we won’t have availability until next year.

Then can you give me something? If I sign up and I become your client, could I get something from you? You have to imagine what those things might be that you could give away, that you’re comfortable giving away. I don’t tend to like things like $5 off, or the second mowing free. People do that and I think it works, but I think you can come up with something little bit more powerful. What is an account worth to you? What could you potentially give them that would be of value to them? You want to work maybe those two things in. Can you create some scarcity? They need to call you right now or they’re going to miss out. Then, what do they get if they call you over the other door hanger?

If I’m looking at these two door hangers and they both look about the same, the companies feel about the same and appear to be pretty good, then why is it that you’re going to get the call over the other one? What can you give them to get them to call you? Maybe it’s as simple as promising you answer the phone and you’ll get them an estimate the day of. That’s pretty difficult to do in spring. Think about that and those points.

I would put your headline and such at the top. At the bottom, that’s where I think our logo, your name, phone number and email address or web address is most important. I would make the top a headline versus your logo and your name. Again, it’s all about them. They don’t really care who you are until after they start working with you and like you. Right now your logo means nothing to them. My logo at CitiTurf means nothing to anybody, nobody cares. What they care about is what they’re going to get and how they’re going to benefit. I make it all about them at the top and then have your stuff more towards the bottom.

Continuing on with your second piece, just a different version. I again, would say that make sure you use both sides. You have room to put copy on both sides of this piece. On both sides you want to have your headline, and on both sides you want to have your web address, your phone number, potentially your logo. Then you could vary the copy in the middle. I’m picturing a headline at the top, phone number, web address, things of that sort at the bottom on both sides, and then the middle could change.

I would like to see, in my opinion, some imagery on both sides. It doesn’t have to be a lot, maybe a nice use of color, things of that sort. I’ve violated what I’m about to say with success, but I tend to prefer black copy not white reverse copy. Not a black door hanger with white copy. It tends to be a little more difficult to read.

Continuing on here. The nice thing about this is that lawn maintenance, landscapes, snow removal, are right at the top. I immediately know what you do. That’s important. Your headline should probably include lawn care or something like that in it, that way I immediately know what you do as I’m walking your piece to the trash. It might make me pause and think, “Actually, I’m looking for a lawn care company. Maybe I should read this.”

A couple things I’d like to see you do on this…105% lawn mowing guarantee, what does that mean to me? What does it mean exactly? It would be nice if you made that guarantee a bit more powerful and said, “It’s 105% money back guarantee!” meaning that if you are dissatisfied with our service and for any reason we can’t make it right, then we will pay you back the full amount of that service that you paid us for, plus 5%. Maybe even with your picture next to it to make it a bit more of a powerful guarantee.

GT Lawns loves cutting grass and it shows. I would say on this one, this is more about you then it is about me. How could you re-position this line to make this to my benefit? Right there you’re talking about yourself, 33 years, that’s okay in my mind because you’re building credibility. Again, this “still having fun” is a little bit about you. Not that it’s bad, it’s just how could you maybe reword this to make it about me and what I get out of this? I get to work with a company that has 33 years of experience, I get to work with a company that has a strong reputation taking care of high profile properties in my local market. What are those big benefits that you can communicate to me and word in such a way that it’s about me and not so much about you? That’s definitely something I’ve learned over time, is make it about them.

I think that talking about your people, your training is valuable. I think that it’s worth mentioning that. I think sometimes we have to be a little more clear on what that means to them. For example, why do I care that you train your people? That’s definitely something I’ve learned. We spend all our time in this business so a lot of times when we picture what we’re saying … for example, we have a visual picture that goes with the words we’re saying such as, where was it, “detail is in the people”. You have a mental picture in your mind of what that means because you’ve been doing this business for so long. But, Mrs. Smith hasn’t the faintest idea what you’re doing and actually thinks what you’re doing is very easy and doesn’t put value into how hard what you do is. The “detail is in the people” might mean nothing to her. Who knows what that picture in her head will be.

Sometimes when you say something like “we train our people”, it’s not so much “we train”, it needs to be repositioned as a statement of benefit, such as “we background check our people” . I would not say it this way but, “We background check our people to protect your family” or something along that line. Background check is the word you want to use but what does that mean to me? What that means to me is that you’re not going to put anybody on my property that you haven’t checked out and you’re not 100% certain that I do not have any concerns about them being around my home, my belongings, or my family.

When it comes to training, what does that mean to me? That means that you’re going to actually close my gates, that I’m going to get a consistently well mowed lawn every single week, there’s not going to be route marks, there’s not going to be debris left in the yard, that the edging is going to be good. What does that training mean to me? You’ve got to almost paint the picture of what that means. State that as a benefit.

When it comes to services, I even like to state the service as a benefit. You can say lawn care, but maybe you want to say something along the line of “beautiful weed free healthy lawn” or “we make your flowers brilliant”, I don’t know, that’s not a good word. How could you state even flower installation in a different way? How could you state flower installation in a different way? Let me add this…you do lawn care, what’s the result of lawn care? You’ll end up with a well manicured, healthy lawn. What’s the benefit of snow removal? It will ensure you can get out of your driveway and eliminate the risk that you slip and fall. Or, however you want to say that. Tell me what the benefit is. You can work the benefit and the word snow removal into one sentence and outline what you can do for me.

I would go back through this, work on some headlines, work on maybe restating some of these services into bullet points. Then I would also think about why you are better than all of your competitors and tell me what those reasons are. Why should I do business with you? Just lay it out for me and then give me a reason. Here you’re making an attempt, our schedule fills up in April, you’re making an attempt to tell me that I better hurry up or you’re going to be full in April. You’re creating some scarcity and reasons for me to take action. Maybe you could define that just a little bit better and make it a little bit more clear to me why your schedule filling up in April matters. Such as, my example I used earlier, you have one truck in my neighborhood this year or you’ve got 14 spots available, do I want one? Historically they’re filled by April 17 every year, or something like that. Tell me why I should take action.

I hope that helps. Thanks a lot.

Why You Should Be Charging Higher Prices

Charging Higher Prices Benefits Your Clients… The Video Above Explains Why.

The question is, “How much do I charge a lawn care client? I don’t want to overcharge or undercharge for landscape services.”

The main point I want to make about this topic is that you absolutely don’t want to be the low-priced company.

When you are the low-price solution provider, you can’t hire the best employees, have the best trucks and equipment, or spend the most money on marketing to out-market everybody else. You can’t afford to do all those things that ultimately make you a much better company at customer service. If you can’t afford the best employees because you don’t charge enough, then you don’t really have a good business. Great employees make your life easy.

Your strategy should be to be one of the higher-priced providers in your market. Not because you’re gouging your clients, but so that you can deliver incredible service to your clients. Most clients expect very little out of a lawn care business. If you can deliver anything better than the norm, you have the chance to wow them. You have the chance to get a lot of referrals and really grow your business.

Strategically, go in with the goal to be an average- to high-priced service provider. Start out average to learn the business. Get in the marketplace and study your competition. Use your competition as your guideline for quoting and for pricing. Use those same prices with your clients. Then study your own business. Learn your own business so you know how to price effectively.

If you have no knowledge whatsoever about pricing, there’s really no magic formula that says charge $55 per man-hour and this is what you do to figure out exactly how many hours there are going to be on the job. It’s all a learning experience. It’s about getting burned a couple of times and then never making those mistakes again. It’s about asking clients what they paid previously. It’s about price shopping your competition. It’s about having your friends ask the competition to come out and do an estimate at their home so that you can learn what they would charge. It’s about doing whatever you’ve got to do to figure out how to price.

Again, no magic solution, you just have to get out there and see what others are charging. Go on their websites and look around. You’ll start to build a feel. If you’re starting out first in residential, it’s really easy to figure out pricing.

Commercial, that’s a whole different deal and is a lot more difficult. That’s why I generally don’t recommend somebody that is just starting out in the lawn care industry to begin on the commercial side until you’ve got your feet wet. You have to understand the relationship of time to square footage, time to man production, time to equipment size, and then task the right equipment and the right size to the right property and the right area on the property. You also have to make sure you have the right guys working on the right task at each property. It’s a whole different game.

I recommend starting out in residential where it’s easy to figure out what your competition’s charging. Then go into the market and charge the average to get your feet wet. Learn the business for yourself. Then before you know it your pricing questions all go away.

If that doesn’t help, please ask another question and I’ll be happy to clarify again.

 

Timing Tips: When To Distribute Door Hangers

 Watch this video to learn the best time to distribute door hangers.

This question comes from David and it has to do with the timing of placing door hangers and marketing on homes. He has been waiting until the “perfect” time to put out his door hangers but has noticed that competitors have already taken over some of the properties in the neighborhoods that he wants to target. He wonders if he should continue to wait and follow his schedule or if he should go ahead and get his marketing out there.

If I’m targeting, and aggressively going after a neighborhood, then I would think in terms of putting out door hangers, and other marketing, more than once.

The ideal time generally, to market lawn mowing, is when the grass is just starting to grow, the weeds are just started to pop up, and the weather is just starting to warm up. It feels like suddenly the birds are chirping and spring is happening and the grass is going to go from dormant to a little bit of green in the next week or two. Right there, at that moment, is the ideal time.

Now, if you’re doing fertilization and weed control, then you back up. There is an earlier time point that makes sense because weeds have already started to pop through the dormant grass and so homeowners and commercial properties are already thinking about this. If it’s pest control, or irrigation it’s different and so on.

Let’s just use a simple example of mowing. There is an opportune time. If you have a budget and all you can do is put out one or two blocks of door hangers or letters, then you wait till the time that will give you the highest probability of selling the most work.

Who cares that you’re going to lose a job here or there? Who cares? You want to go after the most. You will lose the work on the early movers. You’ll lose the late movers as well. So be it. But, you need to put your door hangers out at the time when the greatest number of people are going to be receptive, and so you don’t want to panic. Don’t worry about the early movers.

Now, the ideal scenario is that you have enough door hangers or enough letters to put them out more than once. David mentioned that he was putting out letters.

When I hear letters, I generally think of something you could produce on your own or at very low cost. Also when I hear, it’s a neighborhood across the street, I think, if you’re just starting out, you could put those out yourself and could do it 7 times if you had to. If that’s the scenario, then don’t wait. Get your letters out now, and then get them out again in 2 weeks, and then get them out again in 2 weeks. I mean own it. Pound that neighborhood. If it’s a good one, then it’s one you want to own.

The answer to your question David, comes down to your budget. If you have virtually no money, and for whatever reason you can’t print more of these things, then you wait until the absolute best moment when the greatest number of people are potential buyers and you don’t worry about those that are moving a little more quickly.

If you have a little bit of money and you can afford it, then you go out and you put them out multiple times. That’s going to give you the highest chance of success. You start a little bit early and you put them out several times. That’s the winning formula. Good luck.

How To Start a Lawn Care Business Without Much Money

I spoke with Eric Cozart at Dirtcheap Startup about the Starting a Successful New Business. See the links below for the audio podcast and the article.

Dirt Cheap Start up Soundcloud

https://soundcloud.com/dirtcheapstartup/2015-series-start-a-successful-service-business-johnathan-pototschnik-lawncare-millionaire

 

Dirt Cheap Startup Article

http://www.dirtcheapstartup.com/2015-series-start-a-successful-service-business-johnathan-pototschnik-lawncare-millionaire/

Get the Podcast on iTunes!

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/dirtcheap-startup-show/id914556100